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carriage, and that's william howard taft on the right and then the president, woodrow wilson, on the left. 1933 we have a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and her hoover. the two of them did not along so well. there was not a lot of conversation during their right to the capital. in many pictures that were taken at stake, roosevelt can be seen waving to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning toward hoover and trying to have a conversation, but in every picture you'll ever see hoover is looking straight ahead ignoring him. there have been other times for the president bill did not get along so well. that chapter is called can't we all belong. sometimes it whether it -- weather is a big issue. there in the carriage. and here is the route that they take, pennsylvania avenue heading toward the capital. now, from 1829 all the way through 1967, which covers the great majority of american inauguration's, they took place on the east side of the capitol, that east side. if you have been to washington you know that is where the side with the library of congress's and the united states
taft on the right into the new president woodrow wilson on the left. in 1933 we had a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and herbert hoover. the two of them didn't get along so well. there wasn't a lot of conversations during their right to the capitol in of the pictures the were taken that day roosevelt can be seen leading to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning towards hoover and trying to have a conversation. every picture you will ever see he is looking straight ahead ignoring him. there's another times also for the presidents didn't get along so well and those were mentioned in my book and that chapter is called can't we all get along. sometimes where there is a big issue here is the 1909 that's william howard taft dredging together with teddy roosevelt. we can't see them there in the carriage and here's the route they take. that's pennsylvania avenue heading towards the capitol. from 1829 all the way through 1977, which covers the great majority of the american inaugurations they took place on the east side of the capitol that if you've been to washington than yo
exactly 100 years ago. an open carriage, and that is william howard taft on the right and the new president woodrow wilson on the left. in 1933 we have a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and herbert hoover. the two of them didn't get along so well. there wasn't a lot of conversation during the right to the capitol. in many pictures the were taken that day, roosevelt can be seen leading to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning toward hoover and trying to have a conversation. every picture you will see hoover is just looking ahead ignoring him. there's been other times also where the president, the newly and the old, didn't get along so well and that mentioned in my book can't we all get along. sometimes the weather is a big issue. here's 1909 that is william howard taft driving together with teddy roosevelt. we can't see them, but they are in the carriage. and here is the route they take. that's pennsylvania avenue heading toward the capitol. now from 1829 all the way through 1977, which covers the great majority of american inaugurations they took place on the east side
. >>> taft guy: . >> good afternoon commissioners my name is taft sky and i have been a street artist since 1974 most artists like the jefferson street made into a policewoman 98 and the widened sidewalks provide space for our three by 4-foot booth and is we used to have more than five spaces on the street but due to construction we have only about 15 left. even though most artists don't work there due to lack of spaces available we circulated a pigs this last weekend and over 225 artists signed it requesting that these few spaces remain part of our program i sent you a copy of this possession last week. the petition reads for most of those years we have had handmaid wears between hide and jones street and the construction project will begins in 2013 ask will revitalize the area and open a new pedestrian mall and we feel we add to the colorful ambiance of however we feel fear father fear our space may be limit and had so we petition you to give us the same number of spaces we have had and we have yet to hear a definitive yes that we will clueinged in the plan. on the port commission webs
to the oil town of taft the pump prices are still more than $3 a gallon. taft was founded when the oil began gushing, it has not experienced a spill over from the oil boom. >> if someone asks you what was the biggest oil spill in american history you might be tempted to answer that bp blow out in the gulf of mexico back in 2010. but in fact, the largest was right here in california in 1910. an oil well blew in kern county in what would be known as the lake view gusher. in the year and a half before it stopped that gusher would dump 900 million-gallons into the landscape around it. that oil is still in the ground there and in 2010, rita williams brought us the story of the lake view gusher. >> lure has it that in 1810 so called dry charlie wood drilled deep one last time and hit pave dirt. black dirt gushed into the sky for the next 18 months. >> it was primitive, when it came you had to run for your lives. >> reporter: way more than twice the greatest estimates of spilled oil. the pressure was so great that a cap of wooden beams was blown to pieces. finally the company built an enbankment o
, welcome back. under the taft-hartley law. president obama can step into end this strike. is there any sense at all that he will do it? >> well, it has become a rare opportunity for the president to intervene in strikes. we are at a near record low for the number of work stopages in this country. we have seen five labor movements and trying to shut down the airlines on the thanksgiving break. it is clear that the unions feel that they have the wind at their back. >> well, the old taft heaartley law spawned the national labor relations board. that is something that, i come back to this again, have the business people involved. they are cutting off the supplies and the economy down there. california is one of the worst economic basket cases in the state. has any one appealed to the state or the board to put a taft hearty injunction in place? >> is it in the buzz? >> there is a buzz about it. the retail federation has asked him to intervene. when did they ask him? when did they ask the president to intervene do you have a sense of what the timing was? is. >> there was a process that invol
wouldn't be the first overweight president. william howard taft weighed more than 300 pounds. he once became stuck in a white house bathtub and needed six men, six men, to pull him out. christie would be a change from the current president who frequently plays basketball and golfs. or mountain biking enthusiast george w. bush, who i think he called that bike biky. besides the rigors of the campaign trail, there's the fitterness test to be commander in chief. there is no fitness test to be commander in chief as there is for american service members. a new report by the washington post found that obesity is a rapidly growing problem in the military. the number of active duty members to be found overweight or obese has tripled since 1998. in 200975% of applicants to the military were deemed unfit for service with obesity being the leading cause. we're back. so, i mean, i'm going to you first. the issue is could somebody countriedably and is it fair to have someone be commander in chief when their own troops are not allowed to serve in f they are obese and he is obese? >> first thing, i f
day just doesn't exist today. i mean, when bob taft gave ike a tough time, blowing up at him at a meeting, ike took him golfing, and they became buddies. when taft died, taft was a friend of ike's. ike had personal charm, extraordinary charm, cold cold-blooded, but he had a warmth and used it on congressmen, and that's what we need today because we need a deal. there's no way we're going -- you know, i think we're going over the fiscal cliff here, and it's going to be a big crisis, and everybody's going to wring their hands, and that's, hopefully, we're going to get a deal which is going to require raising taxes, which the republicans are going to hit, and cutting back entitlements that the democrats are going to hate, but it needs a compromise. i wish eisenhower were here to engineer that compromise. yes, sir? >> two quick questions. the first one is in response to something thaw yoid just minutes ago. i just came here from the vietnam memorial wall, and there are names from 1959. i think those needed to be noted in a footnote as happening -- >> that's true. >> under preside
inspired by a regae singer is pulled. what happened to tafte students after they drank it. and we are tracking the new storm. sand you patel is up -- sandhya patel is up next with live doppler 7hd. all of that in moments and then late other "nightline." >> dan, a tale of luck gone wrong as one woman stands trial for allegedly killing a jackpot winner for his millions. plus the controversial man made super fish that could be coming to a grocery store knee [ female announcer ] can your pancake mix do this? sure, bisquick makes delicious pancakes, but that's just the start. unleash the hidden power of bisquick. see what you can make at bisquick.com. [ female announcer ] let betty crocker do the measuring and get a head start on delicious homemade cookies. ♪ just pour, mix...love. tonight to the proposed closure of four fire stations in the east bay. voters turned down a measure that would have saved stations in lafayette, walnut creek, clayton and a station in martinez not far from the shell oil refinery. abc7 news reporter alan wang is live in martinez to explain what this means f
. the great grandson of the 27th president and leading financial ceo in his own right, john taft is going to be our guest host. n] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. >>> it's getting down to the wire. >> republicans have bent over backwards. >> we're in the name situation we've been in for a long time. >> america heads closer to the edge of the fiscal cliff. how businesses are bracing for the worst, and what it means for your money. >> and could the looming trouble at the capitol be the right time to buy? >> i love gold! >> why gold could be the hottest investment trend in the new year. second hour of "squawk box" starts right now. ♪ >>> welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc, i'm andrew ross sorkin along with joe kernen. becky quick con
clearly symbolized in robert taft's run for the presidency against eisenhower during the primary campaign. taft, as we all know, loses, but has interesting conversation he has with eisenhower after congratulating him on victory that the theme he wants eisenhower to pursue is liberty is being threatened by creeping socialism in every domestic field. there's a kind of totalitarianism that is invading american politics. eisenhower takes this language up much more than we really realize. is hard right strip the new deal because the new deal is interchangeable with a version of either socialism or totalitarianism. this becomes especially difficult, this hard-line language becomes especially difficult once nixon has to face up to the thing that gets him into trouble which is a problem we would put in the category of campaign finance problems, that he is taking money by people who have a direct interest in shaping american politics. but this tension within the republican party on foreign policy but also on domestic policy is a big part of the story. the biggest part of the story is the populist
good buddies but when taft died, taft was a friend. you know, ike knew how to turn on his personal china. he had extraordinary warmth. yes, he was difficult but he had a warmth and he would use it. on congressman. that's a we need today because we've got to get a deal. no way we are going fast but i think were going over the cliff, fiscal cliff here, and it's going to be a big crisis and everybody will wring their hands and then hopefully we're going to get a deal, which is going to require raising taxes. republicans going to hate and cutting back entitlements and democrats like the. and it will require a complex. i wish dwight eisenhower here work to engineer that compromise. >> two quick questions. the first one is in response to something you said just a few minutes ago. i just came here from the vietnam memorial wall, and there are some names from 1959 picks i think those need to be noted at least in a footnote. this happening under president eisenhower's watch. >> that's true. >> the bigger question as with or spoken to or spoken, you've only or spoken to you for i'm about but
on a continuum. 1935, the national relation's act is passed. the mlra. by 1947, the taft hartley act is passed and that begins a systematic rollback of labor law in this country but it takes a while to work in the courts because the courts mike more and more increased rulings that effectively strip merp workers from having a right to form a union and it's in '73, so '47 taft hartley begins the attack. workers can no longer do solidarity strikes. >> explain that. >> it means that if the nurses and the hospitals say to the defend our patients we're going to wind up being taking a strike or do something, it means that the u.p.s. driver who is delivering can't go on strike in solidarity with him. workers literally in this country are barred from having solidarity. that's one. two, the second thing taft hartley did that was devastating and this is where american labor leaders need to change their own position is they said unions could only bargain over wages and weeking conditions. that is what began to break the connection between the american online ons and mean communities. they have to fight ov
the granddaughter a tour. there was the most beautiful portrait of mrs. taft. and we all know the president taft was our largest -- i mean, heaviest, president, 350 pounds. he could not get a regular bathtub. so i thought it was so interesting, this beautiful portrait of mrs. taft over here, and, look, she has this hourglass figure, and her husband was the heaviest president. alice said, she never looked like that. she had her head painted on somebody else's body. [laughter] well, let me tell you, susan and i went to see helen taft manning, her daughter. and she had been president of -- i have forgotten, one of the seven sister schools. and there she had a portrait, a photograph of her mother and father on their 25th wedding anniversary in the white house. and, you know what, she did not look like that. [laughter] she, you know, just had those nice kind of sagging bosoms, and -- a lovely lady, but she did not look like that lady in the portrait. [laughter] and ever since then, i have been wanting to get the same person to do me. [laughter] but coming in know, really, this is full circle, because
henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio elector college, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, secretary jon husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes america great and unique. it is a tradition that has withstood the test of time, and it is an honor for me and for all of us to play our role in this perspective chapter of our state's history. as required by law,
they are not new tells you something. they are ready to be taft by politicians who don't have the better angels in mind. the fact that that's where they are going after this election is stunning. steve clemmons, thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> we'll be right back. >>> so it turns out the fake grass root ops the right have been concealing astonishingly inviting we're just get pg the de details of tonight. that's coming up. hold on. [ female announcer ] what does the anti-aging power of olay total effects plus the perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest beauty trend. total effects cc cream c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging flawlessly. cc what's possible. >>> do you remember school picture day in junior high? it turn out we subject our elected officials to that humiliation as well. like your photos put those awkward photos of you on the frig where they remain today, feathered hair and all, the u.s. printing office hopefully keeps a record of our elected officials' official class pictures. these are from 1999. the 106th congre
for persuasion. in the 1940s before a law called the taft-hartley act was passed, unions could have closed shops. in order to work somewhere, you had to be a member of a union. giving employees "right to work." the term used for a series of bills in the '40s and '50s predominantly in the south and west that ban requirements that nonunion employees pay unions for negotiating contracts and other services. for years, right to work laws were primarily concentrated in states that didn't have history of labor unions, but that's changed. now, 23 sfats have right to work laws. as you can see, it's encroaching in on the midwest and not quite in the northeast yet. republicans stand on the crus. in the state that might be most associated with unions, michigan. organized labor groups have called for a day of action and are expecting thousands to descend on the capital. as the state legislature reconvenes for what is final work to right bill. the latest in the midwest, a as we remember scott walker pushed legislation through his state house that pushed employee. john kasich's efforts to curve collective barg
in this country. it has been the essence of the attack on unionization since the taft hartley act in the 19 -- right in the beginning of the 1950s. what we're seeing now is that coming home to roost. it was limited to just a few southern states, mostly anti-union states from the start. now it is coming to the heartland. it is coming to the heartland probably most likely because in 2010 the supreme court basically said we are taking away all of the constraints on political giving, political donations, very wealthy people, companies, wall street. now basically, the constraints are gone. we have a bunch of republican legislatures and republican governors even in heartland states like michigan and wisconsin certainly that are willing and eager to take on unions because that's what their patrons want. >> eliot: our time is up but i want you to come back in the near future because your blog posting which put this into the larger context of the other elements on the assault on middle class income from the taxes, the budget cuts
the taft hartley act to avoid work stoppage, a shutdown of florida ports is not an option. president obama did not signify how he would have reacted had the strike happened. would he have chosen, we can't alienate all our union campaign supporters that just got us elected. or would we actually deal with an economy that is struggling possibly even a one-two punch with a fiscal cliff and strike. all this could return 30 days from now. >> indeed. phil, thank %ou. obesity rates in america have been growing quickly and steadily for decades. but finally a sliver of good news about the country's health. the new numbers on your children are next. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! >>> a potential bright spot is in the battle against childhood obesity. obese rates among young children in low income homes dipped. the rate began dropping 8 or 9 years ago and by 2010 fell below 15%. while the drop was
is propose this legislation through the taft harley act, anti-union, anti-labor act. that's his first legislation, before sputnik, even, he supports federal education. he supports a number of liberal issues. there are more conservative issues thates vetoing for, but not because he's conservative. does that answer your question? [laughter] >> a history lesson. >> the point i was trying to make is if you look at his total record, i can go on forever, but it's scattered throughout the book, in the obama chapter, there's an enborsement of president obama. everyone said he changed. no, he's always been consistent on this. >> any other questions? all right. well, thank you both so much for joining us. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next on c-span, south carolina governor nicky haley announce are her replacement for senator jim demint's seat as well as demint's farewell spenchings and later kay bailey hutchison delivers her fairwell address. tomorrow on "washington journal" we'll talk about the la
is propose this legislation through the taft harley act, anti-union, anti-labor act. that was his first legislation. he supports a federal aid to education. he supports a number of liberal issues. there are more conservative -- conservative issues he has voted for. does that answer your question? [laughter] >> if you look at his total record, i can go on forever. it is scattered throughout the book. the obama chapter -- everybody said obama grew and changed. no he did not. >> any other questions? thank you president so much for joining us. -- both so much for joining us. [applause] >> >>, south carolina governor and the key kelly announcing her replacement for senator jim demint's speech, followed by the senator's speech on the floor. and then a senator kay bailey hutchinson delivers her farewell address. tomorrow on "washington journal," will talk about the fiscal cliff with stand colander and joshua gordon. by the authorsed of the new e book from politico, glen fresh and jonathan martin. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. >> as president obama begins hi
to be president because, being a unitarian, he did not believe in the virgin birth. the public elected taft. there is a paradox at work. america is the first and most relentlessly modern nation. it is also the most religious modern nation. one important reason for this is that we have disentangled religion from public institutions. there has long been a commonplace assumption, one that my dear friend called the liberal expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion and ethnicity. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. -- founders. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the ancients sought to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he def
authority is president invoke the authority under taft-hartley act which is what president bush did in 2002 after 10 days. adam: the damage after a few days seems like it would be immense the way you described the supply chain. we would have essentially a dead halt. like hitting a brick wall. >> that is correct. we're still trying to figure out what the impact was from the eight-day strike at ports of los angeles and long beach. we're still cleaning up from that. obviously would have much more impact if you havehe full east coast and gulf coast go down because of a shutdown. adam: i believe it has to do with partial capping how much longshoremen are paid for weight of certain cargos they unload the operators want to cap it. the longshoremen do not want to cap it. is there room for a settlement before we hit the deadline? >> we really hope there is. there are a lot of issues still on the table between both side that need to be diussed. the continued royalty issues is the latest issue that has come up. really the only way to make ogress and get a new deal is for parties to stay at table and c
will not die a unitarian. the public elected taft. the presidential nominee said his opponent for president, taft, was unfit to be president because being a unitarian, he did not believe in the virgin birth. the public yawned and elected taft. there is a paradox at work. america is the first and most relentlessly modern nation. to the consternation of the social scientists,it is also the most religious modern nation. one important reason for this is that we have disentangled religion from public institutions. there has long been a commonplace assumption, one that my dear friend called the liberal expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that pre-modern pre-modern forces will lose their saliency. the two most important of these allegedly pre market forces are religion and ethnicity. of course, every day and every region, offense refute the liberal expectancy. religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity still derives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer
-year-old, senator taft arguing the taft-hartley law, at least i heard my parents talk about it, section 14-b of the act said workers in the state didn't have to pay union dues to get a job. then i very well remember everett dirksen's argument on the senate floor, president johnson at the behest of union leaders wanted to repeal the taft-hartly act. and dirksen said it is the right of the state. if they override a bill or override a veto, that should be the prerogative of those who represented the states in the constitutional convention was safeguarded by that cause in the constitution upheld consistently by the supreme court. finally, mr. president, i could be, as a tennesseean upset that indiana and now michigan appear to have adopted right-to-work laws that puts us at less of a competitive advantage. i believe in states' rights. i believe states have the right to be wrong as well as the right to be right. and with all these midwestern states having the right to be wrong and not having right-to-work laws, we benefited enormously in our state by the arrival of the auto industries and other m
at the bottom the screening tissue when a shop for them right now and this is one that nobody is for taft.let's spend the rest of time right here. >>guest: this is a significant detail on the jacket it makes a significant look for this particular jacket. >>host: i was talking about staying around paris. >>guest: to want to really stay about the bears because it is been since 1985 that your barris hasn't won a super bowl championship. you have some crazy players on your team. >>host: we had a lot of fun and we need to get anm.b.a. fan >>guest: the embroidery has a nice pot at and beautiful colors. >>host: this is all embroidered and we are not talking about anything as greta favor repeal of this is the finest quality for any appeal or discolor. the quality is the finest in town when i talk about the americas and being honest life for all of the nation to see. >>guest: five super bowls here for dallas cowboys and the quarterback was trite ameroy. tony roma's, one of those guys that is like jekyll and hyde and is up and down throughout the season and hasn't been able to get th
of characters, it it looks doubtful. >> the fact they are not new tells you something. they are ready to be taft by politicians who don't have the better angels in mind. the fact that that's where they are going after this election is stunning. steve clemmons, thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> we'll be right back. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep medicare... and social security strong for generations to come. i tell them dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula kills 99.9% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains, cleaning in a better way than brushing with toothpaste. that's why i recommend using polident. [ male announcer ] polident. cleaner, fresher, bright
seriously large mammals as presidents before too. william howard taft, famously, a very large guy. grover cleveland before him. so this isn't unprecedented territory. let's not pretend that it is. more important than someone's weight or even what health concerns they have is probably their age. and chris christie is just 50 years old. so while he absolutely should, in a matter of health, get himself in better shape, we've had presidents elected with far more serious health problems, polio, fdr, adson's disease, jfk. >> woodrow wilson had a stroke and the entire nation did not know his wife was running the country? >> effectively, yes. in his second term, wilson had a stroke and his wife was running the country. we've dealt with health problems in presidents before. this is obvious. no one is going to be surprised that this is an issue. >> but we're in an age of demanding to know everything and reality tv. >> we have a fascination with 2016 and a fascination with superficial appearances, when really this job is about substance and performance. >> john avalon, getting to the heart of the ma
.m. they will not be quite as cold. you can see it is coming in at 5:00 a.m. but i could not notified by taft. it will still be cold. you can this tool.this-shower activity. by 4:00 a.m., i do not know if it is quite as illegal. s 5:00 a.m., the about of cloud coverage. . i'm not sure if i buy that-- >>jacqueline: from 2:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m., 30-34 degrees with slippery sidewalks and please give yourself extra minutes to defrost your windshield. and also, to the north bay. i do not think that the clouds are going to move in to keep temperatures warm enough to avoid freezing. 30's through fairfield, these frosted viceroy continue frost advisor'. oakland, san mateo. and along the coast temperatures to in the afternoon are really not that warm regard 40's for the north bay, 50s and the san francisco, and 50s in the san jose. for the sierras, some of flurries with more snowfall. and if you're planning on making a weekend drive to tire chain laws and take your car. showers expected though we are going to be dealing with that cold. saturday, sunday looks more likely. and also when state, thursday of next week >>cath
, bob taft, nixon, guys that were really boring and who wanted to be one of them? and kennedy came along and said, no, this is the right thing to be doing. like hemingway did with writing, this is the thing you've got to be doing if you want to be a guy, this is it, and women later. and i think that really is what a leader is. and of course he got us to the moon, created the peace corps, the first real civil rights president. as my son, michael, points out, he's a real history buff, he took the segregationist party and made it a civil rights party. and he inspired people to go into public life. he said, public life is where it's at. it's not sport, it's public life. that's the one redolent reality of our lives. he's still there as the symbol of, look at bill clinton. all of these guys are inspired to go into public life because of him. >> do you see in the second generation after president kennedy, others that still may rise up and become big national leaders? >> i don't see it yet. i think the new joe kennedy in congress will do very well. he may be there for life if he wants to be. pat
, forcing the closure of this vital transportation link for days. it soon became apparent that taft suffered the most severe blow. this vital link build more than 100 years ago was completely devastated by flooding. the storm water soaked case on containing decades old symbols and communication equipment flooded with seawater causing extensive and say it -- and in some cases irreparable damage. our team worked around the clock to pump out tunnel that stations and go to the painstaking process of restoring power to the substations. replacing equipment along the entire route. one of our workers risked his own life jumping into several feet of flood water so he could restart a critical pump. he told me he was simply doing his job, much like the hundreds of workers still toiling to restore full service to our network. men and women of the port authority police department made life-saving contributions. in spite of the damage to are printed in the structure, just one day after the storm, we were able to open for bridges, an action vital to the connection between new york and new jersey. on octobe
presidential nominee said that his opponent was unfit to be president, because taft did not leave in the virgin birth. the public yawns and elected taft. there is a fascinating paradox at work in our nation's history. america is the first and most relentlessly modern nation. it is, to the consternation of social scientist, the most religious modern nation. one important reason for this is that we have this entangled religion from public institutions -- disentangled religion from public institutions. pat moynihan, a liberal in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world po
are hoping to possibly invoke the taft-hartley act to stop the international longshoreman's association from going through with this strike. do you expect that to happen? >> well the president could intervene. he could step in and say, hold on a minute, do not walk off the job. we've got to intervene in this situation. that is seen as unlikely. the president doesn't want to get involved in this. if he did, then the existing contract will be put at a standstill. that would be to the advantage of the employers. not to the advantage of the unions. this is a very pro-union administration. it is therefore unlikely that the president with step in at this point. a strike, as of now, seems very likely, patti ann. patti ann: stu varney, thank you so much. for more on how this strike would affect the economy let's take a look at this. the gulf and east coast ports in question handle 95% of all containerized shipments from maine to texas. a 10-day lockout at west coast ports 10 years ago cost the u.s. economy an estimated one billion dollars a day. the strike would include five busiest ports in the u.s
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